Sunday, March 3, 2013

The Great Steak Debate!


Last night we had another rare night to be alone.  The kids were away spending the night with friends, so we had Date Night!  The weather was beautiful yesterday, so my husband wanted to grill steaks.  We headed over to our butcher and picked out some beautiful bone-in club steaks.

So what exactly is a club steak, you ask?  Great question.  The answer depends on who you ask.  We were under the impression that a club steak is a bone-in ribeye steak.  So let's chew the fat on this subject.  I Googled the definition of "club steak" before writing this post to make sure I give correct information.  Little did I know that there was so much controversy surrounding this steak!  Apparently, this cut was originally named after a famous restaurant in New York called Delmonico's. However, the definition of Delmonico steaks vary greatly from source to source.  Some people call it a boneless ribeye steak.  Some people call it a strip steak.  Some sources say it's boneless and some say it's bone in.  It's also been compared to a T-bone without the tenderloin muscle, thus giving you a very tender steak.  I also looked at Delmonico's current menu, and their Delmonico Steak says, "Vintage All Natural Boneless Rib Eye."  But they also have something called Delmonico's Double Rib Chop which is a "Three Pound Bone In Rib Eye."

Whatever it is, Club, Bone-In Ribeye, or Delmonico steak, here's a picture of one of our "club" steaks.

Now, that's a steak!


No, your eyes aren't playing tricks on you.  That is my husband's steak with a tape measure next to it, and it is, indeed, two inches thick.  (Mine was only one inch thick.)

These steaks were in the case at the butcher shop right next to the rib-eye steaks and they looked really similar to me, one with a bone and one without a bone.  (Actually, the two-inch steak has to be cut upon request by the butcher.  They don't put those in the case.)  

So I'm sure you're completely satisfied with my resolution of whatever this steak is...ha ha.  Called by any name you want, it's good.  I think I'll call that one a John Steak for my husband.

We ate the steaks with my Creamed Spinach (Sides tab), Sauteed Mushrooms (Sides tab), Homemade Steak Sauce (Basics tab), and Steak Butter (Basics tab).  We also had a baked potato.  Just in case you were wondering.

Fire up the grill!

GRILLED CLUB STEAKS (OR BONE-IN RIBEYES)
Two club steaks (1 to 2 inches thick)
Olive oil
Worcestershire sauce
8 cloves garlic, minced
Salt and pepper
Charcoal (my husband prefers the natural hardwood charcoal, not the briquette things)
A grill

At least two hours before grilling the steaks, liberally season the steaks with salt and pepper on both sides of the steaks.  Drizzle on some Worcestershire sauce, olive oil and two cloves of minced garlic on each side of the steaks.  Let it sit at room temperature, covered, for two hours.

About 30 minutes before you're ready to cook the steaks, fire up your grill.  John suggests not using lighter fluid to ignite the charcoal since it taints the flavor of the steaks.  Instead, he uses something called a chimney.  It's like a tall can with a handle.  You pour the charcoal in the top.  He puts plain white paper in the bottom and lights that.  When the charcoal is lit, you then dump it into the grill under the grate.  Make sure the coals are 1-2 inches away from the grate.

You'll know the coals are ready with the 4 x 4 rule:  Hold your hand 4 inches above the grate.  If you can only hold your hand there for four seconds, it's ready.

FOR A 2-INCH STEAK
Sear the steak over direct heat for four minutes on each side.  Then move the steaks to indirect heat and cook 3-6 minutes each side for rare, 5-8 minutes on each side for medium rare, and 7-10 minutes for well done.

FOR A 1-INCH STEAK
Sear the steak over direct heat for 2 minutes on each side.  Then move the steaks to indirect heat and cook 2-3 minutes on each side for rare, 3-5 minutes on each side for medium rare, and 5-7 minutes on each side for well done.

Let the steaks rest covered with foil for 10 minutes before cutting into to redistribute the juices and ensure your steak is tender.

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