Sunday, September 21, 2014

Copycat Schlotzsky's


My husband is a HUGE Schlotzsky's fan.  Whenever he travels for work, he always eats there.  I like Schlotzsky's too, so I knew I had to recreate this sandwich.  I did make my own bread here which is a little more involved.  If you aren't a bread baker, this recipe may be a little more scary for you. But don't worry.  Working with yeast is a lot easier than you may think.  It takes patience, accurate measuring, and time. Also, I did not give measurements for the sandwich fillings since we all fill our sandwiches differently.  I got two 8-inch buns and one 6-inch bun from the recipe, only because that's the only size round pans I have.  You could easily get about four six-inch buns out of this.  You could also just do free-form buns on sheet pans.  

We both felt this sandwich tasted just like Schlotzsky's.  So good, in fact, that we ate it twice in a week!  Enjoy!

NOTE:  You will need a sourdough starter for this recipe. They are very easy to make and it takes just a little bit of time each day to feed it.  King Arthur has good starter instructions here (click for recipe).

SCHLOTZSKY'S ORIGINAL
FOR THE BREAD:
1 1/2 C sourdough starter
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon highly active yeast
3/4 C milk, warmed to 110-115 degrees
1/4 warm water, about 110-115 degrees
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3 C flour
Cornmeal (for baking, not for the dough)
Melted butter (not for the dough)

FOR THE GARLIC SPREAD:
1 C mayonnaise
1 T dried parsley
2-3 teaspoons garlic powder
1 T vinegar
Salt & pepper, to taste

FOR THE SANDWICH:
Shredded Mozarella
Shredded Parmesan
Shredded Cheddar cheese
Cotto salami slices
Genoa salami slices
Deli sliced ham
Mustard
Sliced red onions
Sliced tomatoes
Chopped black olives
Chopped iceberg lettuce

For the buns, put the warm milk, warm water, sourdough starter, sugar, and the yeast into the bowl of a mixer.  Let it sit a few minutes to become frothy.  Add in the remaining sourdough bun ingredients (not the cornmeal or butter) and knead with the dough hook. Knead until it all comes together in a ball.  Place the dough in a large greased bowl and cover. Let it rise in a warm place for 1 to 2 hours, depending on how warm your kitchen is.  It needs to triple in size.  Mine took 2 hours.  

While the bread is rising, mix together the garlic spread ingredients and keep in the fridge until you are ready to use it.

If you are using cake pans (see note above), spray them with nonstick spray and sprinkle in a little cornmeal.  Divide the dough among the pans (use floured hands), more for an 8-inch pan than for a 6-inch pan.  Cover them and let the dough rise again in a warm place until the dough grows to fill in the pans, which will take at least 1 hour.  

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  When the bread is ready, spray the tops of the dough with nonstick spray and bake it for about 20 minutes or until it is browned well on top and done.  Brush the tops of the bread with some melted butter to keep it soft.  Let the buns cool before slicing.

To assemble the sandwiches, split the buns open.  Spread some of the garlic spread on each half of the buns.  Sprinkle some Parmesan on both halves of each bun.  Sprinkle Cheddar cheese on the bottom buns and Mozzarella on the top buns.  Place the buns on a sheet pan.  Place piles of salami and ham on the sheet pan next to the buns to heat. Place this all under the broiler and broil until cheese is melted.  Remove from the oven and place the ham and salami on each bottom bun and garnish with mustard, black olives, tomato slices, lettuce and onion slices.  I like mine with some Pepperoncini peppers too!

6 comments:

  1. Yummmeeee! Love me some Schlotzsky's!

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    Replies
    1. They are really good and so close to the real deal, Marcia!

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  2. This sounds yummy. No decent sub places in my little town ��

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  3. I love Schlotzsky's sandwiches but I'm not a bread baker. If you have a Panera bread bakery in your area their Sea Salt or Asiago Cheese Focaccia bread is a wonderful substitute. It has the same consistency and shape that holds up to the sauces and meats.

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